There have been two dog attacks on sheep in the Forest of Dean recently that have left sheep dead and others needing to be euthanised.

Last Wednesday (November 3) between 3.30pm and 4pm a dog was seen chasing sheep on farmland in the Lower Wye Valley area of St Briavels.

The dog, a black and white sheepdog-type breed, was not under control and the owner was not seen during the attack.

It attacked a number of the sheep and chased them - leaving at least one of the sheep dead.

In a separate incident in the area of Forest Vale Road in Cinderford last month a dog chased a small flock of ewes that were in an enclosure.

The enclosure has signs at access points, warning dog owners to keep their dogs on a lead due to livestock.

Two ewes were mauled and suffered significant bite wounds which resulted in them needing to be euthanised.

Several other ewes suffered injuries from what is believed to have been a large dog.

Rural and wildlife crime officer PC Cath McDay said: "Both of these incidents have happened on land near to large housing estates.

"The owners may have seen the space and felt it was an ideal place to let their dog off for a run, without realising there were sheep in there.

"This is irresponsible and you must ensure a field or area has no livestock in it before letting your dog off lead.

"It is the law to keep your dog under control and the responsibility falls with the owner.

"Anyone who is found to be worrying livestock can not only be prosecuted by the police, they can be fined and also have orders placed on their dog.

"This crime has a devastating impact on both the livestock and their owners."

Anyone with information is asked to call the police on 101 or online through a form at gloucestershire.police.uk.

They should quote incident 206 of 14 October if information relates to the Cinderford attack and incident 294 of 3 November if the attack in the Lower Wye Valley.

Allowing a dog to worry or attack livestock is a criminal offence under the Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953.

Ultimately a landowner by law, and as a last resort for protecting their livestock, is able to shoot a dog which they believe is worrying sheep.

Police must be notified within 48 hours if this course of action is taken.